Mick Forster's Land Rovers


Land Rover 109 Safari; new petrol tank March 2007

Land Rover 109

A new petrol tank for the Safari 109"

The Long Wheelbase Land Rover 109 Safari had a new petrol tank fitted when the new galvanised chassis rebuild was done in 1998. This tank started leaking during February 2007. I had put about 10 gallons in and used a lot of it on a run to Wales, but when we got back it was dripping onto the drive. I got my tube from the garage and the jerry can and syphoned off almost 5 gallons which stopped the leaks.
It wasn't too much of a problem because I usually run on LPG and the number of places to buy it has increased a lot over the years. It did cross my mind to dispense with a petrol tank altogether but then after our trip to Somerset I decided I would feel happier with the extra range a petrol tank would give. The Long Wheelbase Safari has its petrol tank at the back of the chassis just in front of the rear cross-member which has holes for the two bolts securing the rear of the tank. The front of the tank has a length of angle iron which is bolted at each end to brackets on the chassis. The tank has a capacity of 15 gallons that's 68 litres which sounds a lot more when you are paying for a full tank of petrol. But the tank is heavy even when empty. This tank also had the new type of fuel guage sender which is held in place with a bayonet type fixing ring as opposed to the old type which had 6 screws holding it in place.



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The back of the Safari The petrol tank at the back Sender and take off pipe Air lock pipes

The Landy before

The tank was rusting away and not that slowly now.


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On axle stands One rusty tank Rear offside Under the tank

Up on axle stands

The first task was to take the wheels off and put axle stands under the rear axle.


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The filler pipe

The filler pipe from the tank is attached to the filler pipe on the body, where you actually put petrol in, by a sort of flexible rubber/fabric hose. This hose is held in place by two large hose clips. Since this is exposed to the wet and dirt thrown up by the wheel these clips rust.


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The old tank comes off

The four fixing nuts and bolts were removed, eventually and with the tank supported on the trolley jack it was moved out.


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And the new tank goes on

The new tank ready to be mauled into place. The new plate to support the filler looks good. And the bayonet clip holds the gauge sender in place.
After two days almost, job done. It didn't leak either when I put the 4 gallons of petrol back in.
It was another week before I finally got round to putting more petrol in and running on that instead of LPG for bit. Everything seemed fine, just hope it stays that way.





Contact: mick@britpics.co.uk | ©2007 M.G.Forster